“Ciudades Globales, Calles Locales”, Marca la Razón de Comprar en Pequeño

Origen: Global Cities, Local Streets

Que significa realmente para las ciudades la frase “Compra Local”Los autores de “Global Cities, Local Streets” hacen un argumento por la preservacion del comercio a pequeña escala.

 EILLIE ANZILOTTI  @eillieanzi  Oct 6, 2016
Orchard Street on the Lower East Side teems with shoppers in 1975. (Jerry Mosey/AP)

En los pocos meses que he vivido en Crown Heights, Brooklyn, dos nuevos bares han abierto a una cuadra de mi apartamento. El barrio, una vez famoso por el crimen violento, está en medio de lo que el The New York Times describe como un “renacimiento”. Nuevos restaurantes, cafés y boutiques atraen a gente de todo el barrio, en su mayoría a una calle: Franklin Avenue.

“Las compras y actividad comercial en una calle, sea por parte de lugareños o no, define realmente cómo entendemos los cambios que tienen lugar en un barrio”, dice Phil Kasinitz, profesor de sociología del CUNY Graduate Center. Kasinitz, junto con Sharon Zukin del CUNY Graduate Center y Xiangming Chen de Trinity College, son los autores del nuevo libro “Global Cities, Local Streets: Everyday Diversity from New York to Shanghai” (Routledge, $32).

In the book, the authors examine 12 shopping streets in six cities—New York, Shanghai, Tokyo, Amsterdam, Berlin, and Toronto—to demonstrate how global and cultural shifts play out in local enclaves. The authors discovered patterns across the sites: chain stores invading shopping streets at the expense of mom-and-pops; bars, coffee shops, and art galleries cropping up as harbingers of what the authors call “gentrification by hipsters”; immigrants from around the world establishing small businesses in neighborhoods where they may not live, creating a “super-diversity” that reflects and informs shifts taking hold in cities.

Change at the neighborhood level, Kasinitz says, is often quantified through residential data. But it’s local shopping streets, Zukin adds, that function “as the public face of communities.” In Global Cities, Local Streets, the authors argue that these streets are essential for cities’ character.

CityLab caught up with Kasinitz and Zukin to discuss shopping streets and how communities should preserve them.

What did you look for in selecting the streets to research for the book? What purpose do they serve?

ZUKIN: We were searching for streets that were important in terms of neighborhood identity, but weren’t central business corridors or necessarily well-known on a broader scale. These are normal, local marketplaces, surrounded by residential areas, where people supply themselves with the everyday necessities of life. In New York, we chose Orchard Street on the Lower East Side, which has a tradition of small-scale bargain shopping, over, say, Fifth Avenue. In the book, we quote a passage from E.B. White’s Here is New York, where he describes the city as a patchwork of neighborhoods, marked by the repetition of these local shopping streets. It’s a beautiful way of representing what feels like the soul of any big city: this village-like nature. Local shopping streets enable interactions between strangers; it’s a respite from some of the alienation and anonymity of the city.

One of the main points you make throughout the book is how, despite their local specificity, these streets reflect globalization. How so?

KASINITZ: In big, modern cities, local shopping streets, when they work well, strike a balance between neighbors and strangers. They’re cosmopolitan spaces. In working with colleagues all over the world on this book, it was surprising to learn that the owners of small shops on local streets are usually outsiders in some sense: they’re often ethnic minorities, immigrants, or out-of-towners. They may not live in the area themselves, but they become the pillars of the neighborhood because they spend more of their waking hours there than many of the residents do.

Fulton Street, a main thoroughfare in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. (Anthony Camerano/AP)

Small businesses are often under threat in cities. What’s at stake for neighborhoods if these local streets are not sustained?

KASINITZ: It’s a story you hear over and over again: In major cities that are growing increasingly expensive, landlords will raise the rents dramatically at the end of long leases, forcing out mom-and-pop tenants because they know they can make more money by brining in a chain store, like a Starbucks or a Duane Reade. But if everyone’s thinking along those lines, then the street becomes homogenous—there’s no reason to come back to it anymore. It’s the greater-fool theory at work. Right now, huge rent increases encourage instability, which means that landlords will continue to charge more to factor in a period of vacancy every few years. When people hear commercial rent regulation, they compare it to the residential system and freak out, but there has to be a way for cities to discourage massive rent increases and diminish the turnover of small businesses.

What other steps can cities take to preserve local shopping streets?

KASINITZ: You don’t want to preserve the streets like a fly in amber. We’re not advocating that every mom-and-pop be granted some landmark status that can’t be changed; cities are functional, living things, and local streets respond to that.

ZUKIN: You can’t just host a “shop local” campaign to raise awareness about the need for these businesses. There has to be conversation between stakeholders and city council members, in all places across the globe, to discuss legal solutions that are both constitutional and effective. In many places, you can’t prohibit certain kinds of businesses, like chain stores, from opening, but the size of a store can be legislated. Keeping the scale of shops on these streets physically small and economically small is something that can be done—the Manhattan borough president, Gail Brewer, limited the size of storefronts along Amsterdam Avenue to effectively stop big banks from taking over.

And there also needs to be consideration for the factors that sustain the diversity of these streets—class, race, and immigration. If cities continue to permit these expensive changes on local streets, they’ll shut out immigrant entrepreneurship and abet the upscaling of neighborhoods to benefit only more affluent people. In many cities, demographic shifts along the shopping street don’t align with the residential population. City governments could offer apprenticeship systems or financial support to potential owners, who could oversee the next generation of small businesses serving local communities.

Do you think that local shopping streets will continue to survive in major cities?

ZUKIN: At least in the United States, we have an advantage: we’ve gone over the hump of modernization. We’ve had supermarkets, we’ve had transnational chains, and we’ve started to move away from completely embracing those models. Now, I think there’s a growing culture of appreciation for specificity; people are again seeing the value of small shops.

Global Cities, Local Streets, $32 at Amazon.

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